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I Feel Bad About My Back: And Other Thoughts On Aging

Age is an interesting topic. When you’re young, you can hardly wait to be older, have more freedom, and be on your own. During your middle years (whatever that is for you), you may feel you’ve finally hit your stride or go through some sort of mid-life crisis. And becoming a senior citizen is a challenging experience for many.

 

At sixty-five I am struggling a bit. How did I get to be in my 60s when I am in my 30s inside?

 

 

More than ever before, I am mindful of the fact that my days are limited. Without question, I have more days behind me than I do before me (unless I live to be 130). As someone once wrote, just when you start to get comfortable in your own skin, it starts to sag.

 

Sixty-five is a time in life when many people think it’s time to retire. Frequently people imply that maybe I’m done and should take cruises or spend what remaining time I have left sipping tea on the front porch.

 

Done?

 

Nope.

 

True, I probably won’t be doing any backflips off the diving board anytime soon. I’m pretty sure my back and knees are way beyond any aggressive downhill skiing. And I have wrinkles and hair in some strange places.

 

 

But as long as I have breath in my lungs, I plan on pressing the pedal to the metal!

 

Frankly, the “end” has always been coming. At eighteen I didn’t own my tomorrows. There’s never any guaranteed life expectancy at any age.

 

But here are a few things I’m learning about being a senior:

 

  • Young or not, it’s never wise to waste time or your God-given gifts and talents. So, even if you’re oldish, keep investing in life, in others, and in your future.

 

  • Don’t deny the reality of the things you may not be able to do anymore. However, you can still learn something new, you can still grow, and you can still experience an abundant life. Focus your attention and energies where you can and make a difference today.

 

  • Refuse to quit. Decide to have a positive attitude. (Positive people live longer.) Commit to leaving a legacy by actively investing in those in your wake. The Psalmist wrote that you can “still bear fruit in your old age.” And you can.

 

Most young people don’t realize how short and precious life is, but your life doesn’t end until it does. (That’s worth reading again).

 

Let's live today as if it were our last, but without fear, because every day we can make a difference for eternity.

 

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KurtBubna

Kurt W. Bubna published his first book with Tyndale in 2013 and has published six other books. Bubna is an internationally recognized blogger, a conference and retreat speaker, and an experienced leadership coach. Kurt is also the Founding Pastor of Eastpoint Church, a non-denominational congregation in Spokane Valley, Washington. He and his wife, Laura, married in 1975, have four grown children, and ten grandchildren.

This Post Has 6 Comments

  1. Bruce

    Two things I try to remember. 1. We are all going to die some time, 2. I haven’t died yet. I will continue to enjoy life and the blessings God has given to me until that time comes. I’m not going to just sit around and wait no matter the physical issues I may face. As one author put it, I have no intention of dying while I’m still alive.

    1. KurtBubna

      Your reply is just one of the reasons why I love and appreciate you, Bruce!

  2. Brenda

    Amen Kurt!!!!

  3. Momma

    I refuse to believe you are old.

    1. KurtBubna

      Hmmmm…sorry Mom…it happens. 🙂

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